Global market for DNA vaccines to reach $2.7 billion in 2019

August 25, 2014

The vaccine industry is rapidly changing from a mostly empirical approach to a rational design approach. Rapid developments in molecular biology, DNA synthesis and immunobiology enable rational design approaches. These new technologies allow pharmaceutical firms to discover and develop high-value vaccines for novel applications, creating a substantial new market opportunity.

BCC Research provides a detailed report on the DNA vaccines in its report, DNA Vaccines: Technologies and Global Markets. According to this report, the global market for DNA vaccines was valued at $243.7 million in 2013 and is expected to increase to $305.3 million by 2014-end. This is further estimated to reach $2.7 billion by 2019, registering a CAGR of 54.8% from 2014 through 2019.

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Use this report for, but not limited to, the following reasons:

  • Gain an overview of the global market for DNA vaccines and related technologies
  • Analyze global market trends, with data from 2013, estimates for 2014, and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2019
  • Access details concerning delivery and synthesis technologies, the forces driving market growth, product formats, and market applications for these products
  • Obtain information most useful for biotechnology, DNA plasmid, gene therapy, DNA delivery, pharmaceutical, vaccine, animal health, and biodefense companies
  • Review profiles of leading companies in the field as well as updates to alliance, merger, and acquisition activity
SAMPLE FIGURE
GLOBAL VALUE OF DNA VACCINE MARKET BY APPLICATION, 2013–2019
($ MILLIONS)1406027309_BIO067B-0

Click here to order your copy of this report (or any of its chapters) or to download the report overview.


“Forensic Technologies: New and Growing Markets”

April 28, 2008

Technology advancements in forensics have been of considerable import in recent years. Recent examples include improved fingerprint recovery from metals, such as gun cartridges and bomb fragments, use of the chemistry of color to identify chemical and biological weapons, and sensing technologies that are improving the detection of drugs and explosives at security checkpoints.¹

read more | digg story

¹Individual.com

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